Universal Thought

“The beliefs of the Honorable do not always align.”

Children often dream of what they want to be when they grow up. Adults, however, mainly want to have jobs they enjoy; one in which they feel valued, respected, and with opportunities for growth. There are plenty of studies showing how employment impacts our health and mental wellbeing which is far more valuable than what wages alone offers.

Choosing a profession such as a counselor, therapist, or life coach, is frequently initiated by a difficult or challenging event which radically changed that person’s life and now inspires them to help others. That was certainly the case for me. After my marriage fell apart, I was fortunate to find a great therapist. But it wasn’t until three years later, upon completion of my book, when that feeling truly ignited.

I’ll always remember the freedom I felt when my problem was finally pinpointed. The moment I realized it was my own thinking and the negative beliefs I had about myself that was the biggest stumbling block in my life.

Others have described these awakening moments as a weight lifted off their shoulders. Mine was more of an incredible feeling of liberation while ironically giving me a better sense of direction. Although there was still plenty of healing and spiritual growth to be had, there was a confidence before that I’d never fully realized.

My book chronicles part of that journey but mainly focuses on shame and low self-esteem I did not want to admit. The title of the book is: Shame On Me – Healing a Life of Shame-Based Thinking. It details how pervasive shame is, yet continues to go unnoticed by most people. It creates feelings from total unworthiness to complete arrogance. I believed this one concept was the most important one and what the world needed to hear to answer many of its problems.

To this day, I continue to be passionate about this message and wish that everyone could undergo a similar awareness to mine. But there is also something else of equal importance I learned and that is no matter how committed I am to that message, if others don’t share that same passion, it does not make them wrong.

This is perhaps one of the greatest obstacles for many. When we experience something so transformative and lifechanging, we want everyone else to experience that same excitement. No matter how altruistic, unselfish, or noble our concerns appear, we cannot demand or expect everyone to be on board with our entire train of thought. No one philosophy holds the solutions to the entire world’s downfalls.

This realization does not put a damper on my enthusiasm. I continue to become more passionate about helping people understand the devastating effects of shame and guide them through their emotional healing process. But I also understand there are others with a message as passionate and healing as mine. The ultimate goal is helping others, not for everyone else to validate and honor my beliefs.

My thanks to Photo by Alfred Schrock on Unsplash for the beautiful photo and I look forward to your comments.

Advertisements

1 thought on “Universal Thought

  1. Pingback: The thinking gap | Global Creative Empowerment Group

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.